Interview with NEEVA

Where are you from? And how did you start making music?

I have always lived in Cagliari (apart from a few periods spent traveling around Europe). My first approach to music was quite radical: as a young boy and without any knowledge of music theory, I started with doing recordings of small sound fragments and mixing them to create tracks for my mates to sing on. The thing is that at the time most of us in my group of friends were into the music of people like Kool Keith or music giants like Anthony Braxton, but that stuff was way beyond us. We were teenagers who, like all teenagers, got away much better with broad categorisations like white/black, left/right, East/West. But luckily things and people change and eventually what is it about your inclination that makes you take certain choices start to become clearer.

What kind of music do you like? Do you take inspiration from anyone and/or anything?

I still like complexity. I have been always fascinated with all those musicians who do their “own thing” without compromising; out of time and space, they create their own dimension. I am thinking about Kool Keith again (a charismatic character also outside the music sphere), and all the people behind the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, naïf precursors of a certain wave in electronic music (Delia <3); or labels like Cock Rock Disco, Stone Throw and Planet Mu, which in the late ’90 made you wonder: “can you actually do this stuff?”
What I mean is that the message is the medium, the way which things are made. Most of the time what you need is only a certain attitude, both from a human and an artistic perspective.

 

Where does your creative process start? And how do you know that it’s done, that the track is ready?

It’s all very simple: when you gotta do it, you just do it!
As for my personal experience, the creative production process is sacred: forcing it is pointless, spontaneity is key. But this also means having periods of inactivity and that sometimes you let yourself being eaten away by laziness 😦
The closure of the process is a very interesting topic; it’s about paying attention. Potentially you can go from looking at someone wearing a light, polished make up, to realising that in fact you’re staring at a clown from Circo Togni. Balance: it’s about that; but it’s also about being able to deal with your own uncertainties.

Cagliari: how is life there? And how about the creative scene of the city? Is there any particular place you’d recommend?

Cagliari is very beautiful, but you need to love it for the way it is, with all its limits. The quality of the “creative scene” is very high, on all levels; that of the available spaces is much lower. But there are places like Nuovo Panificio, Studio 1984 – Studio Studio and clubs like Muzak, bar Florio and the Covo, which are real gems.

26-neeva

What spaces and opportunities are there in Sardinia for music and art?

The spaces and opportunities do exist, but their use is left in the hands of fate; or at least that’s my impression.

Any future project and/or collaboration?

I haven’t been producing much lately, I’m in an observational phase; but some time ago I’ve started researching on the interaction with Sardinian typical music instruments and on improvisation (sadly with not much time available, sigh).


For more check out
neeva.bandcamp.com
soundcloud.com/neeva
facebook.com/neeva

Image: cover of Ventisei

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